<div dir="ltr"><div><div><div><div><b>@Chip</b><br><br></div>Agreed. Words are very important, it's almost impossible to be 100% air tight and clear about stipulations, even with a lawyer's help because a better lawyer could come along and find holes.<br>
<br></div>I also realize the two are separate, but in terms of how they "play together" here's how I word this for one of my themes:<br><pre>In its unchanged/original state BlankSlate is...

 2011-2013 TidyThemes
GNU General Public License | <a href="https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html">https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html</a>

...however, once you've significantly changed the theme to build your own unique
project, either for yourself or for a client under a different name (as is encouraged)
you're entirely welcome to copyright and license that project as you see fit.</pre>Basically, what I'm saying is that under the freedoms of the GPL they can of course do whatever they want with the code for personal or commercial use, but they can't OWN "BlankSlate". If they want to build their own theme from BlankSlate and name their theme accordingly to their own copyright/trademark they can then OWN that and copyright/license however they please.<br>
<br>Perhaps this doesn't apply to all themes, in fact, I might be giving extra permissions that aren't covered otherwise, but for my intentions of releasing this theme, that's how I understand it. Am I correct in my thinking/phrasing?<br>
</div><div><br></div><b>@Otto</b><br><br></div>I also agree here, if someone really cares about or is concerned about their trademark, registering (<a href="http://www.uspto.gov/">http://www.uspto.gov/</a>) is pretty important. Fair enough, we butt heads on these issues often, and I suppose that's just a matter of fact. I just think we happen to agree here overall on the general issue so I'm confused as to what you disagree with.<br>
</div>